PDC - Permaculture Design Course

PDC - Permaculture Design Course
S.Miguel Island - Azores - Portugal - 11 to 20 February 2019

Use the CSE Comunity Supported Education

Permaculture is to live in harmony with nature providing for human needs and the needs of everything around us

Entreviews to Helder Valente - Permaculture in Portugal and Europe


TV Videos of Helder Valente

TV Italia HERE 2015
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Video at IPC Cuba HERE 2013
Portuguese RDP HERE 2013
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Biosfera da RTP HERE 2011
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PDC Permaculture Design Course in Portugal

New School Permaculture PDC
Permaculture Design Course
 Douro River - Porto - Portugal
31 Oct to 9 Nov 2017

Course taught by Helder Valente and

the New School Permaculture  Team.

Have you ever asked yourself this questions? 

How can i get more connected with nature and understand how it works?
In what way can i save energy on everything i do?
How can i recover and redesign areas or objects in a way that they become more ecological and nature friendly?
How can i live a more healthy life without having to buy so many chemical products?
How can i develop or be part of a network of people that is inspired to be of positive change to this world?

Did you ever found your self having this ideas?
 
I want to develop design skills and find a new way of thinking.
I want to support other people to find a way to live a low impact lifestyle  
I would like to be living connected with nature working the same way it works.
I see myself living with a community that works toguether.
I want to recover an old farm and live with what it can produce.

On this course we will answer these questions and will support  these ideas


Thic course will be on a more than 40Ha Porto wine farm on the margins of the Douro River.

On this course we will cover the same topics covered on the conventional PDC with an extra atention on how to keep vineyars with the permaculture way of thinking.

   
What is Permaculture?
Permaculture is a sustainable design system that provides for human needs while having positive effects on the surrounding environment.

 It is based on the ethics of earth care, people care and fair share, and provides practical solutions to the global crises we are currently facing.

To know more about what we do on the PDC click HERE



Helder studied and worked with pioneers like Bill Mollison and Geoff Lawton in Turkey, Doug Bullock in the Amazon, Rosemary Morrow in Austria, Graham Bell in Scotland, Darren dougherty, Ernst Gotcsh, Sepp Holzer in Portugal and many others in countries like Haiti, Canada, Egipt, Finland, Peru, always learning and practicing this sustainable design methods.

While living in the city he dedicated 5 years on developing urban permaculture projects and for the last 5 years traveling and developing permaculture institutes around the world. 

 It all started in 2009 teaching permaculture to students at the agriculture university and since then learning and teaching in many different climates and getting to know the old ways and new ways of sharing information.


 By December 2012 in the Peruvian Amazon working in support to the shipibo indigenous communities Helder created the New School Permaculture and  is now developing alternative educational methods.

In 2013 the New School has been presenting at the IPC International Permaculture congress in Cuba



The New School Permaculture uses creative and inspiring educational tools that enable the students to empower each other in a way that many people have never experienced in their lives before.


To see testimonials from our students
click HERE

The course is presented by creative non formal education methods, that are based on creating a bridge between the right and left side of the brain, so that the analytical and creative abilities of the students get fully stimulated and get the most out of the experience...for many people is the most empowering and inspiring transformative process of their lives...and they carry this with them every were they go....and thats our goal.


The subjects covered during this Permaculture Design Course include:

The ethics and principles of Permaculture
Learning strategies

Educational Methods
 Reading the landscape 
Pattern in design
Biodiversity
Water preservation
Forests and trees
Soils building
Climates
Buildings and natural construction
Alternative economies
Community development


 INFO 
Contacto:
newschoolpermies(at)gmail.com

If you want to be part of this course fill up the registration form
CLICK HERE
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1tb4iTi7aI9DY2HafqmsbFxoVhnQHHhnCA7MltkBikN0/prefill


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Hope to see you with us on this adventure



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En castellano

El curso sigue un plan de estudios conjunto y conduce al Certificado en Diseño de Permacultura internacionalmente reconocido.
Facilitado por Helder Valente y amigos de la Permacultura New School.
Helder estudió y trabajó con pioneros como Bill Mollison, Sepp Holzer, Doug Bullock, Rosemary Morrow, Darren dougherty, Ernst Gotsh y otros, y ahora enseña en todo el mundo.
Se inició en 2009 con la enseñanza de la permacultura a estudiantes en la Universidad Agrícola y desde entonces continúa el aprendizaje y la enseñanza en muchos climas diferentes.
Mientras vivía en la ciudad dedicó 3 años al desarrollo de un proyecto de permacultura urbana en el centro de Lisboa y co-creó el Instituto de Permacultura Portugués.
Así es como empezó todo.
Helder nunca se detuvo y estos últimos meses pasó su tiempo de trabajo con los agricultores quechuas en los Andes, el diseño de proyectos en la selva amazónica y ecoaldeas como Findhorn.
Muy recientemente, fue uno de los presentadores en el IPC Convergencia Internacional de Permacultura en La Habana Cuba
En esta oportunidad, el PDCse celebra en la hermosa isla subtropical de Tenerife (Islas Canarias – España), que cuenta con una variedad increíble de microclimas.
Los temas tratados durante este Curso de Diseño de Permacultura incluyen:
Ética y principios de la Permacultura
Estrategias de aprendizaje
El concepto de “Patrones” en el diseño
Biodiversidad
Conservación del agua
Producción de alimentos
Los bosques y los árboles
Contrucción de suelo
Climas
Edificios y construcciones naturales
Economías alternativas
Desarrollo comunitario

Los primeros tres días de este curso se pueden reservar como Curso Introductorio de Permacultura, o puede permanecer para el curso completo PDC.
INFO Contacto:
newschoolpermies(at)gmail.com

The prairie ecossistem

A description of the past

The Pre-Settlement PrairieAn "Ocean of Grass"

When the first European explorers crossed the middle of the North American continent they were met with an awesome expanse of grassland. They didn't even have a word for it - the French, in a characteristically dismissive vein, described it as a meadow. The English were apparently more awed; they adopted the romance of the French language, if not its literal meaning, and called it a "prairie." Later, one of the early settlers wrote, in 1841, that "for miles the prairie gently sloped, hardly presenting a bush to relieve the eye. In the distance, the green skirting of woods, which fringed either border of a large stream, softened down the view. Occasionally a deer would jump suddenly from his noonday rest, and scamper off..."
Before the arrival of the Europeans, this sea of grass is estimated to have contained approximately one person per 5000 acres. The native peoples lived off the land, as hunters of vast herds of bison and the pronghorn antelope, deer and elk that roamed the prairies. They used hides for their clothing and shelter, and supplemented their diets with native plants; some built homes using the abundant prairie grasses.
Their relationship to the land was a spiritual one; they said that the trees spoke to them, and that the animals were their brothers and sisters. The sky was their father, and the earth was their mother. It was a relationship that lasted perhaps 10,000 years before the white man came.
Before 1850, the great mid-continental grasslands stretched from southern Wisconsin to western Montana, from central Texas to Canada. In wet periods the tall grasses of the eastern edge of the prairie might advance deeper into the midgrass territory. In years of drought the hardier short grasses, which extended all the way to the foot of the Rocky Mountains, might expand their range to the east.
These grasslands had existed, in one form or another, for millions of years, as a result of the innumerable interactions of sea and wind and earth which formed the world as we know it today. Fossil evidence indicates that most plants of the modern prairie were present during the Pleistocene time, about a million years ago. At the time the United States was being settled, however, few of the settlers had any botanical training, and most descriptions from journals of the time are written by people who described the grasses in layman's language. Those who did know plants were not very much better off - these New World species were for the most part unfamiliar to them. Whatever we know today about the composition of these prairies must be inferred from the few relicts which have survived the grazing, agricultural and urban uses of the past hundred and fifty years.
Because of the geographic position of Texas, and its complex biotic history, it contains a great diversity of both plant and animal species. The state is located at the crossroads of the eastern deciduous forest, the coastal plain, the grasslands, and the Sonoran desert and Tamaulipan biogeographic provinces. Over 5000 vascular plant species occur within Texas, and over 500 species of grasses. More species of animals occur in Texas than any other of the continental states.
The natural landscape of Texas is, in fact, rarely the unbroken stretch of grassland which characterized much of the native tallgrass prairies to the north. Because of the heterogeneity of soil and climate conditions and the presence of many river systems, the Texas grasslands, except some portions of the High Plains, have always been part of a mosaic which includes riparian areas, bottomland woods, and intermittent streams, making them unique in all the prairie regions of the country.

The Rise of "King Cotton"
The End of the Red Man's Civilization
The European settlement of the prairie marked the end of the civilization that had sustained it and been sustained by it for thousands of years. The settlers were pioneers in the truest sense - with a determination to survive and thrive under the harshest of conditions, and to use the bounty of the earth to enrich not only their own lives but the lives of others on this continent and around the world. But the end of the red man's civilization was a violent and bloody one. During the process the land also changed dramatically, and in an incredibly short time.
Before the Civil War, between twenty and sixty million bison roamed the North American plains. By 1900, less than a thousand were still alive. As Black Elk, the famous Sioux Indian chief recalled, "I can remember when the bison were so many that they could not be counted, but more and more Wasichus (white men) came to kill them until there were only heaps of bones scattered where they used to be. The Wasichus did not kill them to eat; they killed them for the metal that makes them crazy, and they took only the hides to sell. Sometimes they did not even take the hides, only the tongues; and I have heard that fire-boats came down the Missouri River loaded with dried bison tongues. You can see that the men who did this were crazy..." The activity of the white man in slaughtering the buffalo was as incomprehensible to the natives of the plains as was their own "primitive" lifestyle and nomadic behavior to the European settlers.
An old holy woman of the Wintu tribe, reflecting on the strange ways of the settlers, said, "The white people never cared for land or deer or bear. When we Indians kill meat, we eat it all up. When we dig roots we make little holes. When we build houses, we make little holes. When we burn grass for grasshoppers, we don't ruin things. We shake down acorns and pinenuts, we don't chop down the trees. But the white people plow up the ground, pull down trees, kill everything... How can the spirit of the earth like the white man? Everywhere the white man has touched it, it is sore."
It was only a matter of a few years before the European settlers, with their belief in man's "dominion over the earth," and their ingenuity in finding ways to conquer and exploit nature and its resources, had fundamentally changed the character of man's relationship to the land, and with it, the character of the prairies themselves.
Cattle Country
The first Caucasian occupants of the Texas Blackland Prairie were not farmers; the thick sod and heavy, droughty black clay soils - later to be called the "dinner bell" soils, too wet to plow before dinner and too dry after dinner - were almost impossible to cultivate with the wooden mold-board plow in use at the time. So those who wanted to take up farming when the Spanish first opened Texas to colonization in the early 1800s settled in the southeastern part of the state near the Gulf Coast, where the soils were more amenable to cultivation with wooden implements.

Early land grants in the Blacklands were mostly taken by cattlemen, where the tall grasses - "high enough to hide cattle and long enough to tie in a knot around a horse's back" - made excellent forage. The grazing patterns of the cattle differed from those of the buffalo, and this introduction of domestic livestock was the first major disruption of the grasslands. While the buffalo grazed the land intensively, they soon moved on, giving the grasses time to recover. Under human management, cattle grazing was concentrated in smaller areas, over longer periods of time. The natural species competition and succession of the flora was disturbed, favoring weedy annuals, the shorter, more grazing-tolerant species of grass and species unpalatable to cattle.
Barbed wire was introduced in 1874, and within 15 years most of the state was fenced, which concentrated livestock and resulted in even more overgrazing of the grasslands. In 1885 the combined influences of overgrazing and drought were so severe that hundreds of thousands of cattle starved to death in Texas. By 1890 the grazing capacity of many grasslands was reduced by one-half or more, and the pre-settlement vegetation was permanently altered.
The Sodbusters
It was not until the 1870s and 80s that farmers became interested in cultivating the Blacklands, when the development of the steel plow and other implements had made it possible to cut through the thick prairie sod. The roots were so dense - up to five miles or more of roots might be found in one square meter of grasses - that the prairie literally rang, or twanged, when the steel plows turned over its dense underlayer - "a storm of wild music" was the poetic description given by one wheat farmer's daughter several decades later.

By 1900 most of the Blackland Prairie was under cultivation and was recognized as one of the foremost cotton producing regions of the world. Ellis County in Texas was at the center of this extraordinary accomplishment, and many grand old Victorian homes in the cities of Waxahachie and Ennis still exist, as reminders of the fortunes that were made in those times.
Cultivation was also, however, a catastrophic disruption of the prairie ecosystem. It was a common farmers' joke to tell the story of an old Indian who, having seen a plowed field for the first time, said to the farmer, "Wrong side up." The story was taken to be an illustration of the Indian's ignorance, but in fact when the native grasses are turned under and the soil aerated, the organic matter decomposes faster. This creates a flush of nutrients available to cultivated crops, but when the crops are harvested the nutrients are removed with the harvest, and the soil continues to be depleted year after year. Today's dependence on chemical fertilizers is evidence that perhaps there was more wisdom in that old Indian's statement than was recognized at the time.
Certainly in terms of recovering the lost prairie, his statement was true. Once the roots of the prairie are broken, and its recovery cycle interrupted by conventional agriculture, the grasslands never heal unaided. The prairie ecosystem is so vulnerable to manmade disturbances that the wheel ruts left by the migrations of the mid-nineteenth century are still visible, more than 140 years after the covered wagons carried pioneers on their westward journeys. Similar traces can be seen in prairie remnants of the Chisolm Trail in Texas, including one site near Waco where signs of the wagons which accompanied the great cattle drives can be seen.

The Prairie in the 20th Century
A Vanishing Ecosystem
Although overgrazing and cultivation were the most dramatic disruptions of the natural prairie ecosystem, there have been a number of simultaneously occurring phenomena which have contributed to the destruction of all but a few isolated prairie relicts, and to the degeneration of many of these surviving remnants.
In the early days of cultivation of the Blackland Prairie, mules were the source of power. Many farms maintained a hay meadow where the native grasses were cut for hay or used for pasture. As late as 1930 the practice of maintaining these hay meadows was still common. And although the mowing and grazing altered the species composition of these small "prairies," their root systems and seed banks still contained a living map of the complex prairie ecosystem that had once spanned the continent from north to south, and covered more than 13 million hectares in Texas alone. However, with the advent of tractors most of these meadows and pastures were plowed.
Another very significant early disturbance was the settlers' natural desire to eliminate fires. Periodic prairie fires had for centuries kept woody species to a minimum and had cleared the ground of dead vegetation, enabling the tall grasses to thrive and creating new opportunities for secondary and tertiary grasses and forbs to establish themselves. Once the fires were eliminated, a rapid invasion of woody plants followed.
Most of the prairie remnants found today are those in out-of-the-way places, difficult to cultivate. These too are often invaded by woody species, along with exotic non-native plants which have been cultivated or allowed to spread on nearby land, and then introduced by wildlife or carried on the winds to these otherwise native areas. The Kachina Prairie in Ennis is a typical example of these surviving remnants, and is in the process of being managed back to health through controlled burning and selective weed control in the hope that it can serve as a seed source for prairie restoration efforts on land acquired for the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory.
The Texas Blackland Prairie: Situation Critical
Before the European settlers arrived, the moist eastern prairies of Texas were dominated by the tall grasses such as big bluestem, Indian grass, little bluestem, eastern gamagrass and switch grass. The short grasses such as buffalograss, blue grama and common curly mesquite were dominant in the drier western regions. And in between, mid-grasses such as sideoats grama, little bluestem, silver bluestem and Texas cupgrass were abundant. Running through these belts of grasslands were the Post Oak Belt to the East, and the East and West Cross Timbers to the west of the Blackland Prairie. Throughout the Blacklands, as well, could be found rivers, streams, and bottomland hardwoods.

Today, more than 90% of the area of the main belt of the Blackland Prairie of Texas has been plowed. Many areas, because of exhaustion of the soil or soil erosion, have been returned to permanent grass. But in most cases these lands have been planted to exotic pasture species such as African bermuda grass and lovegrass, Eurasian "King Ranch bluestem," and Mediterranean Johnson grass.
In 1970, a survey was conducted by graduate students of Texas A&M University, across the main belt of the Blackland Prairie. Approximately 100 ungrazed, excellent condition prairie relicts were located, totaling nearly 5000 acres in all. Most of the sites were small, but a few were as large as 700 acres.
In 1980 the area was resurveyed. The number of sites had decreased from 100 to 35, and the area from 5000 to 2000 acres.
The Blackland and associated prairies and woodlands in Texas contain four out of the ten most threatened or endangered plant community series in the United States, as recognized by the Natural Heritage Commission. The total area of fair or better condition plant communities is lowest for the Blackland Prairie, at 0.004% of the area originally covered by this complex ecosystem.

SOURCE

Curso de Agroflorestas e bosques comestiveis sintrópicos

 (CIA) 
Curso de Introdução as Agroflorestas 
e bosques comestiveis sintrópicos 
                                           


Como posso obter a produção máxima de todos os elementos da floresta?
Deve haver uma maneira de fazer o controle natural de pragas, como posso fazer isso?
Eu vivo na cidade, como posso criar uma floresta urbana de alimentos?

Neste curso vamos responder a essas perguntas e muito mais



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Paul Watson and the early days of sea shepperd incidents in Portugal 1979

It is one of the most memorable episodes in the history of environmental activism in defense of the oceans. 



At the turn of the decade from 70 to 80, the Canadian Paul Watson declared war on whaling and sank two ships in Portugal.

The operation marks the beginning of the mission Sea Shepherd. Here it is reported what happened. And the author of prowess account all the JN.

https://www.jn.pt/mundo/interior/afundou-dois-navios-em-portugal-em-nome-da-defesa-das-baleias-5139075.html?jwsource=cl
It was said that the harpoon ship that had already wiped out more than 25,000 whales but no one knew exactly who would be its owner. They came complaints, here and there, giving an account of his ruthless actions and their chilling methods of extermination. The crew of the ship Sierra chacinava whole families of whales, including the young, and their procedure was to annihilate all or any cetacean that deparasse him. Half of the 70 becomes the priority target of environmentalists.
In 1977, Paul Watson, then 27, leaving Greenpeace, which helped found, to be "tired of sterile conversations" and little concrete action. Without a penny in his pocket, unties to seek funding for the purchase of a vessel to enable it to fulfill its purpose in life: to fight the enemies of marine animals. It does this by Cleveland Amory, a writer who devoted his life to defending the rights of animals and chairs the Fund For Animals. Watson buys Westella, a former British trawler of 60 meters, and rename it the Sea Shepherd. "It was the first ship in history to be devoted exclusively to the defense of marine life", say years later.
Paul Watson reinforces the hull with 100 tons of reinforced concrete for the ship to function as icebreaker in a campaign against the seal hunt in Canada on March 79. After that, put an ad in the Boston Globe to recruit crew willing to lançar- to sea in search of the Sierra. Appear 19 men of various nationalities, mostly students and lovers of nature. Run by the Atlantic towards the Azores. They are a few days in Horta to receive the information that the Sierra sailed from Senegal north. Raise anchor without delay. The July 16, 1979, the most coveted target is finally spotted 200 miles west of Leixões. Paul Watson rubs his hands and then makes sure to show that you are not there with rodriguinhos.
"No more nor for what began with attempts to collision, it was very bad weather, we traveled for 22 days had left Senegal with just over 20 whales and were in full sea. Seriously We found ourselves in danger and try to run away," reports to JN, days later the scared head of Sierra machines, a Portuguese named Luis Mendes. Feeling persecuted and harassed, the Sierra seeks shelter the port of Leixões, destination already planned to offload whale meat and overflows it to a refrigerator ship to Japan. It will be the seventh time that the Sierra slope in Leixões to download dead whales.
Always close to prevent leakage, the Sea Shepherd enters in Leixões at 10 am on 17 July. Docks in the Dock 1 to refuel and his crew is controlling the Sierra through binoculars. Paul Watson envisions the enemy, stopped half a mile west of the jetty, is preparing to escape and tells his team that will go on the attack. Afraid of what, 17 crew abandon ship. At 13:30 hours, Watson connects the engine and starts without warning the captaincy.
"They were real pirates with fake wings of angels. There have been us in headscarves and with ribbons in their hair, as the ancient pirates," then told the Portuguese crew of the whaler. Unceremoniously, the Sea Shepherd clash bow against the port side of the Sierra tack, causing you a vertical tear of two meters near the bow and denting to a distance of ten meters. This first shock aims to destroy the harpoon cannon. Immediately thereafter, the Sea Shepherd makes a wide turn 360 degrees to port and back with the bow pointed to the middle of the hull of the Sierra, to starboard, crashing 30 knots a second time amidships and causing damage to the cargo bay and system of refrigeration.



Without delay, and the stunned and severely damaged Sierra, Watson shakes north, trying to escape to England. The corvette Limpopo Portuguese Navy launches in pursuit. For 18 hours, the Portuguese military catch the ship of environmentalists five miles of Spanish territorial waters and force him to return to Leixoes. Paul Watson is taken to the captaincy and takes the feat. Hours later, the Albuquerque commander of the Captaincy of the Port of Leixões tells the press that Watson and company do not hide that the action was willful and deliberate "and not only readily confess to make it a point of honor."
Fixed dockside, Sierra takes to unload 280 tons in bales of 10 kilograms of whale meat that was product of the harvest. Paul Watson is released and says the Portuguese journalists that the act served to "draw the attention of world public opinion for the extermination of whales." The case gained international attention. For now, the talks Daily News in an "unusual and confusing event."
Here are months of legal confusion and requests for damages. In November, the Matosinhos Court decrees that the Sea Shepherd will be retained as compensation payment guarantee to the owners of the Sierra. According to Watson, the authorities would release only the Sea Shepherd by paying 750,000 US dollars - and this for a ship that had cost 120,000.

Unhappy at the possibility of seeing your boat in the hands of whalers - "the idea was to me unbearable," confess later - Watson calls Peter Woof, located in Scotland, and challenges him to meet in Leixões to try to retrieve it. The plan is this: get on the ship at dawn on December 29, start the engines and run stealthily. The plan fails: When climb aboard the Sea Shepherd notice that everything had been stolen during those five months anchored in Leixões. The nautical equipment, radars, 80 tons of fuel, blankets, kitchen accessories and even the electrical installations - all off pilfered by other hands.
Furious, the two environmentalists go to plan B. On the night of December 31 in full New Year, around midnight, return with a wrench and lanterns and open the two bottom valves in the engine room, one the port side and one on the starboard side. "A five meters of water column gushed violently and when we left we had water above the ankles. He felt a heavy heart, his fate was sealed," confess Watson decades later. The Sea Shepherd sinks in a few hours while Portugal toasting with sparkling wine and eat raisins.
The next day, the commander of the Maritime Police of Leixões, Bessa Gil, said to the press that "the case is wrapped in a certain mystery." And no one knows the author of prowess. Peter Woof crosses the Minho river swimming and escapes to Spain. Paul Watson manages to outwit border guards, escapes to England, and called a press conference to take over the operation.

"Terror of the whalers buried in Leixões - whaling ships from around the world can now breath of relief," publishes "O Primeiro de Janeiro" on its front page on January 3, 1980. 
However, the Sierra had been moved to the shipyards Lisnave in Almada for "repairs on the order of 25 million escudos" as the newspapers reported the Portuguese era. On January 11, 1980, crosses the Tagus and cast anchor in Tobacco Garden dock in Lisbon. You are ready to return to the chores and preparing to weigh anchor and set sail on the last day of February.
At dawn on February 6, one delves into the Tagus and puts a magnetic mine in the basement of the Sierra, amidships. It follows an explosion and a hole six meters in the hull. The Sierra sinks in ten minutes, long enough to be evacuated the 4 or 11 people (versions vary) that are on board. No wound is.
On that day, Paul Watson is a courtroom in Quebec, Canada, to make statements on a campaign against the seal hunt. "Of course I was soon the suspect number one, but there will be better alibi than being that day in a courtroom?", Will comment years later.
Two days later, the newspapers report that "an ecological activist who asked not to be identified told UPI be absolutely certain that the explosion that sank the Sierra was not an accident." "I can give 100% guarantees that the explosion was caused," he said.
Although he returned to Portugal a few times in the following years, almost three decades after the incident, in June 2009, Paul Watson is detained at the airport of Madeira when going to a meeting of the International Whaling Commission. "But two hours later they told me I could leave because the arrest warrant in my name after all had already expired," he says now to JN.
In 2012, the book "Entretien avec un pirate" by Lamya Essemlali, Paul Watson said:. "I was born to sink the Sierra If I had not done anything, put an end to the career of this ship would have been enough to give meaning to my life".
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